The mind is a monkey

I have heard people refer to the mind as a monkey in many a spiritual discourse. And there is no disputing that! I have a monkey for a head most of the times. But while watching the cartoon ‘The new adventures of Hanuman’ with Pranav with the other day, I had yet another epiphany. (Seem to be having quite a few of these off-late).

Culture/Mythology has depicted Hanuman, the Monkey God (a devotee of Lord Rama) as a super-strong one.  He is said to have powers to destroy all evil and protect a believer from harm. Watching the cartoon, explaining to Pranav what Hanuman was doing, I realized that if the mind is a monkey, it needs to be a Hanuman. I strongly believe that it is not our ensuing physical emotions but our mind, as in thought process and responses, which is the root cause of all fears, sorrows and illness. If we can make our mind super-strong (Hanuman-like) then we can destroy all negative forces that drag us down. We all need a Hanuman in our head and it is completely in our hands if we choose to succumb to the monkey’s craziness or tame the monkey successfully.

This enlightened thought later, every-time I catch myself succumbing to a thought or emotion that begins to drag me down, I remind myself that its time to bring out the mace and whack it away. And wonders of wonders, it seems to be working most of the time too! Three Cheers for Hanuman, the cartoon and the deity!

Burning our batteries

Two months ago my 8-month-old laptop battery decided it didn’t want to work as hard anymore. 10 minutes after it has been charged fully, it began to warn me that the battery was empty. S quickly blamed me for it, saying I probably left it plugged in on charge for too long. Instead of having an argument, I had an epiphany!

We carry our bodies around, flitting from one scene to another, one memory to another, one drive to other, changing what we put inside, often uncaring about what we put out, till the body tires and demands to be charged. Then, we plug ourselves to momentary happiness. A new outfit, high following an accomplishment, a yummy dinner- the effects of which never last. But when we continue to keep ourselves plugged into these transient pleasures, often we end up frazzling our minds, hearts and bodies in the process. We end up burning our batteries, never being able to reach our potential irrespective of how much we charge ourselves. And so while you enjoy the highs, remember that its important to know when to switch off and disconnect yourself from all. Then carry yourself around with equanimity, grace and peace.

Building our own pyramids

I wrote this sometime in August, saved it as a draft and forgot about it. Then in the ensuing three months, I went on to bury myself inside a pyramid and let myself suffocate. Today reading this, I realized that most of us are wise to our weaknesses and yet, we choose to indulge it, forgetting out strengths in the process.

…..

It begins in the childhood. A slight by someone, when parents unintentionally compare you to someone else, when a success is ignored, when you are berated by your own family, an eve-teasing incident, a friend who turns foe, wrong choices that are rubbed in your face constantly, a dream you weren’t given the chance to chase, when people form cliques you are not included in, when your goodness is thought of as a front- you begin to build your pyramid. Stacking high all the disappointments, rejections, unfulfilled expectations, unheard requests, pain, shame, sorrow, dejection, fear one by one into a pyramid.

After some years you end up building one so high that inside love suffocates. In the airless room with no outlet to soar high, the mind becomes delusional and the heart irrational. Soon everything seems like an event to make you feel more worthless than you are, every word seems like a bullet that is out to wound you, every person seems like the missionary sent to convert you from a joyous soul into an inverted maniac.

Inadvertently many of us end up building our own mausoleum even as we are still alive. We set a trap for ourselves and then spend our lifetime wondering how to escape this place.